K Press Perspective: False Facebook pages appearing for FSM Government elected leaders and appointed officials

Someone has been creating false Facebook pages for FSM government elected leaders and top appointed government officials. It doesn’t seem to be an innocuous, “I had nothing to do, so I created a Facebook page” type of thing. Rather, it seems to be an effort to gain the confidence of unwary Facebook users so that they can draw them into some sort of a financial scam.
The Internet has changed everything. It’s come to the point that some people can’t do much of anything without first consulting sources on the Internet or posting on social media that their feet just hit the ground as they got out of bed, and providing a photo of their feet hitting the ground to prove it.
But be warned, sites on the Internet can be wrong, whether intentionally so, or from malice. They can be disingenuous in the extreme. When some of those fake content sites are called to task, they will often say that their malice is entertainment, as we just saw with the Alex Jones (Info Wars) Custody battle in U.S. news this week.
Blogs and fake news sites on the Internet can take you in if you aren’t careful and vigilant. Some internet sites will prey on your preconceived notions and tell you what you want to hear with the end goal that you will do what they hope you will do. If you aren’t careful, sites on the Internet can steal your identity, your money. If you aren’t very careful, they can even steal the hearts of members of your family.

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Letter to the Editor: Who judges the judges?

Judges are among our most powerful public officials. They are invested with unparalled cases, lifetime tender to insulate them from influence and pressure. But what happens to them when they wield their power irresponsibly and twist the law they are sworn to uphold?
Usually, not that much. Judges are monitored in most cases, by fellow judges who are reluctant to penalize one of their own. Of course, most judges deserve the respect paid to them. But, as our investigation reveals, a disturbing number do not.
Proper investigation can show all.
Joseph Edward


Adding to the education experience
In all our work we ask, “What can we add to the education experience.” It is in the soft options associated with building such as teacher training. This is where we are adding value. We want quality education that enables students to develop skills. That means they can make a meaningful contribution to their community and society once thy have left school. We ensure that they are as employable as possible. Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all.
Our students are yet to do the hands-on exposure to technology skills. For many, it is going to play a critical role in their lives.
The key to having the ability to learn and make meaningful contributions is having a sense of self-respect and self-worth. Children go to school to learn, but modern day education wants to focus on increasing the sense of self-confidence that will enable them to use what they learned effectively.
Joseph Edward

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Opinion Editorial: Webber: Help Yap go to robotics competition

webber opinionLee P. Webber, for PDN
reprinted with permission
When was the last time you heard about the Yap Robotics team? The Yap Robotics team you say? The only thing we know about Yap is stone money, manta rays and grass skirts!
Au contraire.
The Habele Outer Island Education Fund is a U.S.-based 501(c)3 nonprofit, started by former Peace Corps Volunteers, that works across the freely associated states of Micronesia. It sponsored the first Robotics League on Yap, and the island has been invited to attend a global robotics competition in Washington, D.C., this summer.
The first Robotics Day on Yap was held in 2012, in Kolonia. It was a heavily advertised, open-air public event. Local residents described the event as unprecedented. Students and schools were highly enthusiastic.
In 2013, students from Chaminade High School in California provided used parts to refresh and expand the Yap teams' kits. Habele paid for, and coordinated, delivery. Additional new parts were purchased and provided by Habele. Interest in the teams among schools doubled.

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